Violence flares over Zimbabwe poll

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Support for Zanu-PF historically has been deepest in rural areas, particularly the party's Mashonaland heartland, where more than two-thirds of Zimbabwe's 17 million people live.

The Zimbabwe Electoral Commission's results showed Mnangagwa's ZANU-PF cruising to a big majority after picking up 109 seats against 41 for the opposition Movement for Democratic Change (MDC).

The electoral commission said it may take until Saturday-the maximum allowed under the constitution-to declare the presidential victor in Monday's vote, which pitted Mr. Mnangagwa, the longtime strongman's successor against Nelson Chamisa, a lawyer barely half his age. Fifty-eight of the 210 seats in the National Assembly lower house were yet to be declared.

THE Zimbabwe Electoral Commission (ZEC) says it has not received any official complaints from parties and candidates who contested the country's election on Monday as it also announced official results will start trickling in around 3pm this Tuesday.

Meanwhile, the army is reportedly ordering shops and businesses to shut down before lunch hour as the situation remains tense ahead of the announcement of the presidential results.

"It matters little whether this heavy-handed response came on Mnangagwa's orders: evidence that the president lacks the authority to control the security forces will be just as damning in terms of the impact on Zimbabwe's worldwide rehabilitation".

Observers say it could be a tight race, but the opposition has said it will protest if their candidate is defeated.

They went on the rampage down Harare's busy streets towards an old Zanu-PF office with large stones, sticks and anything they could grab along the way.

Mr Mnangagwa's Government has accused Mr Chamisa and his supporters of inciting violence by declaring he had won.

UN Secretary General Antonio Guterres urged Zimbabwe's politicians to exercise restraint, while United Kingdom foreign office minister Harriett Baldwin said she was "deeply concerned" by the violence.

Roseanne Barr says tweet "cost me everything"
Though after apologizing, Barr also offered Jarrett the advice, "She's gotta get a new haircut, I mean seriously". She said: "I hope you'll try to understand me and accept my apologies for my part in this big misunderstanding'".

Speaking in Harare this evening, President Mnangagwa said the hooliganism and violence came as a surprise, adding that the opposition party leadership is to blame.

"We won the popular vote and will defend it!"

As the African nation awaited results from its presidential election on Monday, President Emmerson Mnangagwa tweeted that "we have been in communication" with challenger Nelson Chamisa and that "we must maintain this dialogue in order to protect the peace we hold dear".

"There is no way that ZANU-PF will accept an MDC victory".

The commission said it would release vote totals "sometime" on Thursday, even though it said most of the results "are here with us".

The opposition alleges the elections have irregularities, saying voting results were not posted outside one-fifth of polling stations as required by law.

The European Union (EU) mission has criticised the delay in announcing the presidential results. "Let me also warn such individuals and groups that no one is above the law", Home Affairs Minister Obert Mpofu said.

A Zimbabwean soldier beats a man on a street in Harare on August 1, 2018 as protests erupted over alleged fraud in the country's election.

Another member of the opposition, Eveson Matambanadzo, said: "The results we have are cooked if you compare the people who voted on the ground to the results that are there it doesn't tally".

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